Thought For Food

Welcome to the digital home of Thought For Food Productions!

As an independent theatre company in Toronto, our shows can pop up anywhere in the city. From Leslieville to Parkdale, we’ve brought our signature mix of comedy and menace to audiences for over 20 years.

Helen Juvonen, Tyler J. Seguin. Photo: Tim Hennigar



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Critical Praise

Dark Heart was a sexy historical thriller set in 1661 New France and was a hit with critics and audiences alike. “It’s this kind of smart and sophisticated work that keeps Toronto’s indie theatre scene vital.” (The Toronto Star) “at turns witty and profound; though it deals with heavy subjects and potential tragedy, it’s always fast-paced, sparkling, and fun.” (Mooney on Theatre) “playful, dramatic and even sexy…fun to watch” (NOW Magazine).

The all-female Measure for Measure was praised for its originality and depth: “it would be a challenge to avoid the intoxicating effect of this production. If you’re looking for an interesting (and relevant) new take on a classic Shakespeare tale, Thought For Food’s interpretation should not disappoint.” (The Theatre Reader) “Thought for Food’s Measure for Measure is an immersive, sensual experience. I loved everything about it!” (Mooney On Theatre).

The Trial of Judith K. (a feminist retelling of Kafka’s The Trial) earned accolades for its wit “laugh-out-loud funny before it hits you with its shockingly dark ending.” (Stage Door), “like watching the Red Queen’s court from Alice in Wonderland – utter madness.” and for the strong performances that were described as “SNL worthy” (Theatre Reader).

The Memo (dissident playwright Václav Havel’s masterpiece of absurdism) skewered disturbingly familiar issues in modern corporate culture with a madcap, scathing accuracy that made the production “hilarious and frightening as all good absurdist drama should be” (Christopher Hoile, Stage Door). Critics described it as “a definite must-see!” (The Charlebois Post) and “as freshly funny as it was fifty years ago, and frighteningly just as relevant” (Mooney On Theatre).